Wondering About Waldorf?

Towering Oaks takes its inspiration from the Austrian scientist and philosopher Rudolph Steiner and his development of Waldorf Education. Founded in 1919 in Stuttgart, Germany, Waldorf Education was a conscious move away from the industrial model of educating students.  It aims instead to educate the whole human being through an arts infused, experiential and holistic approach to learning that meets students at their appropriate developmental levels.

 

Almost a century ago, Steiner saw the need for imagination, a sense of truth and a feeling of responsibility as the center of education. Far from withering away, Waldorf schools today are the fastest growing independent educational movement in the world. The Waldorf model of learning is inspired and living learning that imbues its students with the capacity to be lifelong learners.

 

Steiner envisioned classrooms where students engaged their intellect, emotions, and physical bodies in the captivating and rigorous study of humanities and languages, mathematics and sciences, and performing, applied and fine arts. These classroom teachers would artfully guide their students through learning experiences that built upon their inner enthusiasm and curiosity. Competitive testing, academic tracking and extrinsic motivators are not a part of Waldorf classrooms.

 

What does this look like for a student? Students study the core subjects in the humanities and  sciences in blocks of intense focus for 4-6 weeks at a time, in rotation of subjects, instead of filling the day with all the core subjects at once. This is supplemented by a study of mathematics, foreign language, practical and visual arts, instrumental and vocal music, physical education and Eurythmy (a rhythmic form of movement that is specific to Waldorf Schools)  and rounded out with a theatrical performance each year. They engage in environmental, social and artistic projects that tie into their studies. An international network of Waldorf schools allows for travel and attending school in another country, as well as visitors to the school from other countries.

Living Learning:  "A teacher concerned with developing humans affects the students quite differently from a teacher who never thinks about such things." - Rudolph Steiner  

Living Learning: "A teacher concerned with developing humans affects the students quite differently from a teacher who never thinks about such things." - Rudolph Steiner